Commonalities & Differences: Requirements & Disciplines

Within our remit to identify themes and trends in the JISMRD Programme and to enable collaboration and synergies between its projects, exploring commonalities and differences is a key area with a multitude of angles. Diverse endeavours, domains, institutions and scopes on the project side entail a number of approaches, methods, user communities, research practices & cultures, data life cycles, workflows and therefore actual needs, requirements, benefits, data infrastrutures and policies. Knowledge transfer in the programme is crucial to not to re-invent the wheel (at least not every time), learn from previous experiences, discuss emerging topics, collaborate and hence (mutually) benefit from all those differences and commonalities.

In the weeks and months to come I shall focus on commonalities and differences on this blog under different aspects, starting with the requirements and disciplinary angle (albeit I am aware that a lot of areas are overlapping: requirements gathering involves methods as well as research practice and perceived benefits, which again have an impact on costs, et cetera et cetera). The thought would be to ideally start a discourse, get feedback and input from projects and people, gather documentation and discussion topics, facilitate and provide support. A workshop at some later stage might be an activity spawning from that, if deemed useful.

My own project related hat is that of the user liaison & researcher, e.g. gathering requirements, including looking into research practice and benefits of diverse communitites at the University of Manchester previously in the MaDAM project (JISCMRD phase 1; see here for outputs) and now in MiSS (JISCMRD02; see resources section). Our requirements approach in both projects is user-driven, iterative and based on close collaboration between RDM specialists, users/researchers, other stakeholders (high-level buy-in is especially important) and the project team/developers. In MaDAM we were focussing on pilot users from the Biomedical domain – in MiSS the RDMI will have to cater for the whole of the University with the challenge of establishing a balance between a generic, easy-to-use eInfrastructure and providing a system open enough for discipline specific needs (plug-in points). We have user champions in each faculty: Life Sciences (Core Facilities and MIB – large and diverse data), Engineering and Physical Science (Henry Mosley Centre, Material Sciences & MIB – large data), Medical and Human Sciences (sensitive data!) and Humanities (CCSR, applied quantitative social research – data service and diversity) and will also open up a user committee to the wider University for input and feedback in a few weeks. We just have completed our baseline requirements phase, so please watch out on this channel for more details and the report!

But back to you, the JISCMRD projects’ fields of interests and needs:

How do you approach your requirements process?

What are particular challenges, e.g. in specific disciplines?

What are particularly enthralling lessons learned (already)?

How to achive benefits and synergies between projects?

What would be your ideas on how to facilitate (by us) any exchange on such issues, any ideas are welcome!

Meik Poschen  <meik.poschen@manchester.ac.uk>
Twitter:  @MeikPoschen